Feelings or Facts? MBA Students’ Applications Include Emotional Traits Testing

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B-Schools Know How You Think, but How Do You Feel?

By MELISSA KORN

Forget what you know. Business schools increasingly want to know what you feel.Students show emotions at the Joplin High School commencement ceremony in Missouri

Schools are trying to choose from a crowded pool of well-qualified applicants and get a sense of the human being behind the application by adding personality tests and scored, standardized in-person interviews to the traditional battery of essays, transcripts and recommendations. Now, prospective M.B.A. students need to shine by showing emotional traits like empathy, motivation, resilience and dozens of others.

Measuring EQ—or emotional intelligence quotient—is the latest attempt by business schools to identify future stars. Since students typically start their job hunts almost as soon as they arrive on campus, the schools have little time to fix any faults.

“Companies select for top talent with assessments like this,” says Andrew Sama, senior associate director of M.B.A. admissions at University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business. “If we are selecting for future business leaders, why shouldn’t we be [using] similar tools?”

Since the fall of 2010, Mendoza applicants have been required to complete a 206-item online questionnaire called the Personal Characteristics Inventory. It screens them for traits the school has found in its most successful students and graduates, such as teamwork and leadership abilities.

It is difficult to determine the “right” answers. For example, one item asks, “What are your sources for new ideas?” The multiple-choice answers include “reading,” “my own thoughts,” “subject-matter experts,” “family and friends” and “people I work with.” Star students tend to provide the same responses, Mendoza says.

Paul Toboni, a first-year M.B.A. student at the school, says he “couldn’t beat around the bush or give an artificial response” in the online test, unlike with interview talking points.

Still, the 23-year-old Mr. Toboni says he was pleased the school was evaluating his personality and not just the length of his résumé, since he was “shallow” on work experience.

Based on the assessment, Mendoza labels students “recommended” or “not recommended,” though the school may ultimately admit a number of students in the latter category and may reject others in the former.

Mendoza plans to track this spring’s graduates closely, as they are the first class admitted with the explicit consideration of EQ. The school says early indications show that those who scored well on the assessment are highly engaged in classroom and club activities.

Yale School of Management, meanwhile, plans to try out the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test on volunteers from its current batch of applicants in coming weeks. Results of the online self-assessment won’t affect admission decisions, says Bruce DelMonico, assistant dean and director of M.B.A. admissions, because the school is just gathering data on what traits predict success.

The 141-item test, co-created by Yale University Provost Peter Salovey, measures how well applicants might manage or understand their own emotions with questions about everyday scenarios. A candidate might be asked, for example, to predict how someone will react in a certain situation, or to identify someone’s emotions based on a picture.

“Talent assessment is a difficult science,” says Mr. DelMonico, though he says it is getting easier to quantify, or at least figure out, what needs to be assessed.

Dartmouth College’s Tuck School of Business updated its recommendation form this year, fine-tuning questions to better assess EQ. The school says it asks people who recommend a student to score the applicant on ability to cope with pressure, intellectual curiosity and other traits.

Admissions Director Dawna Clarke says she is still on the hunt for a test that accurately and consistently measures EQ.

EQ assessments aren’t altogether new. The MIT Sloan School of Management introduced its “competency model” in 2000, creating a four-zone grid that measures demonstrated success, such as test scores and standout work experience, and personal attributes, such as relationship-building skills and sensitivity to others.

The school doesn’t administer a test like Mendoza does, but rather conducts behavioral interviews that require applicants to offer examples of times they demonstrated various elements of EQ. “You’re assessing wired behavior,” says Rod Garcia, senior admissions director at Sloan.

While a low EQ won’t outright ruin someone who otherwise dazzles on paper, Mr. Garcia says, a high EQ —in certain cases, at least—can offset mediocre performance elsewhere. Sloan is “somewhat flexible” on GMAT scores and academic achievements, Mr. Garcia says.

Admissions consulting firm Veritas Prep added a Myers-Briggs personality assessment to its application-prep and GMAT study packages this spring, after noticing that business schools were paying more attention to personality and emotional maturity.

More than 200 clients took the Myers-Briggs test in just the first few weeks the firm offered it, says Scott Shrum, director of M.B.A. admissions research at Veritas. They can get a report highlighting their strengths and weaknesses in working styles and interpersonal relationships, with nuggets such as “[You] prefer to focus on the task, rather than on the people involved.”

That insight helps students determine which traits to play up or minimize in their applications, or even what kind of school might be a good fit, says Mr. Shrum.

Business schools aren’t the only educational institutions weighing emotional intelligence in their decisions.

University of Notre Dame’s own undergraduate admissions office is taking a cue from Mendoza as it seeks a new way to identify standout students. Stellar test scores and grades don’t differentiate many applicants anymore, laments Donald Bishop, associate vice president for undergraduate enrollment. He says this year the school could have filled its 2,000-student freshman class three times over with applicants who scored in the top 1% nationally on standardized tests or high school transcripts.

Mr. Bishop’s team is in the research phase now, collecting data on current and former stars, and expects to roll out a tool within two to three years.

Meanwhile, University of Ottawa professors recently studied medical school applicants’ EQ factors such as altruism and resilience, then tracked admitted students’ use of mental-health services and other clues they might be headed toward early burnout.

Dr. Derek Puddester, a psychiatry professor at Ottawa involved in the research, says that while hard work and self-sacrifice are often valued in doctors, such traits need to be balanced by an ability to cope with stress.

Some experts say screening for emotional intelligence in admissions isn’t very smart. It is good that business schools are thinking about EQ measures, says Daniel Goleman, a leading psychologist in the field of emotional-intelligence. “But they’re paying attention to it in the wrong way if they’re selecting for it.”

EQ can be learned throughout life, he says, so “It should be the task of the business school itself to help people develop strength in emotional intelligence.”

A version of this article appeared May 2, 2013, on page B1 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Business Schools Know How You Think, but How Do You Feel?.  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324582004578456770420379666.html?mod=wsj_streaming_stream

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu BharwaneyGeetu-High Quality Res

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the appplication of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

Students Need People Skills

People Skills Missing In Workforce, Who’s To Blame?

When people graduate from college, they have a transcript documenting their skills in various academic disciplines.

GraduateAfter many years of hard work and academic training, how much was devoted to developing emotional intelligence?

According to a new study, students graduating from college are not prepared with the people skills needed in a professional work environment, reports Science Daily.

Among the skills the researchers were looking for were the ability to build relationships with others and providing support to colleagues.

The study recommends that, “Universities should consider how to offer opportunities which help graduates develop important leadership skills that at present aren’t developed through degrees.”

“For employers, we found that work performance developed at the start of individuals’ careers rather than later on. This suggests that employers should target more effort at early career development interventions,” according to the study.

The researchers are not suggesting that education and work experience are not beneficial. Rather, the current preparations for the workforce need to be re-evaluated.

Those in the workforce still need the professional and technical skills such as evaluating problems and processing details which university degrees provide. Work experience is also valuable for developing leadership skills.

The study raises the question of where exactly do those entering the workforce gain people skills.

It is possible that people skills are innate or developed during childhood, according to the researchers.

“As people skills are harder to develop and may be innate, employers may be better considering personality measures when selecting for people orientated roles, rather than relying on an individual’s education or experience,” according to Katie Herridge,  a co-leader of the study.

The findings of the research were presented by Rab MacIver, Sarah Chan and Katie Herridge of Saville Consulting at the British Psychological Society’s Division of Occupational Psychology Conference in Glasgow, Scotland.

http://www.designntrend.com/articles/34258/20150109/people-skills-missing-workforce-who-s-blame.htm

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

 

 

New Year: Strengthen Your Emotional Intelligence

Gallery

Four strategies for strengthening your emotional intelligence STRENGTHENING your emotional intelligence takes commitment, discipline and a genuine belief in its value. With time and practice, though, you’ll find that the results you achieve far outweigh the effort it took to … Continue reading

Listen…And Learn

Develop Emotional Intelligence By Learning How You Sound To Others

Sometimes what we say doesn’t go over very well, regardless of our intent. There’s a difference between what we mean when we say something and how it comes across to other people. Learning that difference is an important aspect of becoming emotionally intelligent.

Emotional-Freedom

Emotional intelligence can help you be more aware of how you and others really feel about something. It allows you to adjust your behaviour and adapt to situations so that others find you likable. In turn, it can help you build better relationships in your personal and professional life. Muriel Maignan Wilkins at the Harvard Business Review explains that being emotionally intelligent involves being aware of the gap between intent and impact:

Those with weak emotional intelligence often underestimate what a negative impact their words and actions have on others. They ignore the gap between what they mean to say and what others actually hear… Regardless of what you intend to mean, think about how your words are going to impact others and whether that’s how you want them to feel.

Before you say something, stop, and take a moment to think about how it might sound. Ask yourself how you would feel if someone told you the same thing. Are you making the kind of impression you want to make? Remember, even if you mean well, make sure it sounds like you mean well.

http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2015/01/develop-emotional-intelligence-by-learning-how-you-sound-to-others/

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

 

 

Emotional Intelligence … Is It Legal?

Are you emotionally smart?

More than 20 years after psychologists Peter Salovey and John Mayer introduced the concept of emotional intelligence, it is still a hotly debated issue in the corporate world. Now the discussion has made its way to in-house legal departments as general counsel look for ways to foster more effective relationships with their business units.

Emotional_Intelligence___the_X_Facror_For_Success

Some espouse emotional intelligence as a panacea for creating more productive teams, but others are more skeptical that an ability to skillfully read one’s own emotions and evaluate those of others has real value in the workplace.

 

In a recent LinkedIn post titled “Emotional Intelligence Is Overrrated” Adam Grant suggests it’s a mistake to base hiring or promotion decisions on emotional intelligence, and that doing so can even have a detrimental effect. Emotional intelligence is “a set of skills that can be beneficial in situations where emotional information is rich or vital,” states Grant, a professor of management and psychology at the Wharton School of Business. If your work involves “data, things and ideas,” he argues, too much focus on emotion can be distracting from “working efficiently and effectively.”

In a comprehensive meta-study a few years ago, researchers Dana Joseph and Dan Newman studied 191 different jobs to determine how much emotional intelligence affected job performance. They found that cognitive ability accounted for more than 14 per cent of job performance while emotional intelligence accounted for less than one per cent.

If that argument was meant to persuade lawyers that emotional intelligence doesn’t apply to them, it seemed to fall on deaf ears. At the Association of Corporate Counsel’s annual meeting in New Orleans in October, more than 500 attended a panel discussion on “What Makes Smart Lawyers Fail? How to Increase Your Emotional Intelligence — and Your Impact.”

As legal advisers to the business, lawyers are always standing “slightly outside the circle,” and knowing how to effectively communicate is key to their success, especially when it comes to delivering the “tough messages” to the business, says Norma Formanek, senior vice president and general counsel of Trilliant Networks in Redwood City, Calif., and a panel participant. She argues that being an effective lawyer involves communicating complex legal concepts in a way business people can both understand and appropriately respond to. “In-house lawyers can break down boundaries by [positioning] themselves as helpers to their colleagues, as someone who supports them and helps them through the difficult decisions they need to make,” she says. “If you can deliver a tough message constructively and without an excess of emotion, you don’t drive people underground [to the point] where they don’t want to share problems with you.”

Formanek believes that emotional intelligence is a tool lawyers can use to become more self-aware and more attuned to how others perceive their messages.“I can’t control what they think or their emotional reactions, but I can control the way I’m behaving and communicating so I’m not triggering emotional reactions or negative reactions that might get in the way of a constructive discussion.”

A little self-awareness goes a long way toward more productive work relationships, says Formanek, and the reverse is also true. She has met her share of “top-tier, brand-name” lawyers whose career opportunities have been limited because of their inability to “deal with people in an emotionally mature, reasonable, and constructive way.” As a litigation partner in private practice, she worked with a lawyer who was an expert in his specialty, but who treated “the rank and file like dirt.”

“He knew more in his subject area than I know about everything else in the world, but he reduced people to tears. And then he was fired.”

In collaborative working environments, emotional intelligence can act as a building block that helps lawyers create more effective relationships with their business colleagues, argues Stephen Roth, vice president and general counsel at  Jewelry Television, also a panelist at the EI roundtable. “ In my experience a lot of the ability to be effective depends on building relationships,” says Roth. “You can be much more persuasive and effective if you have a relationship.” As a member of a legal team that works as part of a larger organization, “your job is to come up with ways to move the business forward.” Roth says fostering respect for emotional intelligence can be a challenge in the corporate world, especially with lawyers where, traditionally, so much attention has been paid to cognitive ability and technical prowess.“ Part of it is they really don’t believe there’s a need to develop any of these skills put under the EI umbrella. They’re focused on technical competence; knowing their field and knowing it thoroughly — and that’s important. But with in-house lawyers, these are not one-off clients; these are people you’ll be working with for years.”

Kerry O’Reilly believes emotional intelligence is the foundation for all human interaction, and when she’s adding to her legal team at Vale, it weighs heavily in her hiring decisions. In a field filled with highly intelligent people, cognitive ability and “book smarts” are a given, says O’Reilly, but she wants lawyers who can convey complex ideas in non-technical jargon and effectively navigate through a maze of personalities.“ You have to establish that they’re a good substantive lawyer, but that’s not hard to do,” argues O’Reilly, head of legal, corporate, and marketing for Vale’s Base Metals business. “The difficult thing is finding a good personality fit. There’s no shortage of bright lawyers who surpass all the academic bars. What differentiates one from another is all the soft skills they bring to the table.”In the highly competitive legal field, those who are adept at reading and responding to the legal needs of their fellow business units will have an edge, O’Reilly says.“We all know the legal field is extremely competitive and it’s important to get a step ahead. Emotional intelligence is a super step ahead if you can master it.”

Read more:  Patricia MacInnis :  http://www.canadianlawyermag.com/5387/Are-you-emotionally-smart.html

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

Crisis…What Crisis? Using Emotional Intelligence

Emotion ShiftEmotional Intelligence and Crisis: Does it Matter?

A mainstay of leadership is to handle crisis with aplomb and an effective resolution.

Unfortunately, for many leaders this is not always their approach.

At times, the intention may be to lead through a dramatic predicament into order, but the leader may be masking or blunting his or her emotional state, which may impact the way he or she is perceived by employees. This leader may also be paying a higher price in physical health and emotional well-being from the affect of anxiety, stress or even depression.

Clearly, there is also the case of a leader who yells at his subordinates when there is a crisis or stress. This does not engender loyalty or respect, as opposed to being a leader who remains in control of him or herself, while collectedly appraising the circumstances at hand.

How important is emotional intelligence in handling crisis?

As a leader, it is important to develop action through consistent understanding and connection to the goal. When crisis erupts it is not the time to deviate and make decisions from a state of reaction. The crisis is temporary. Whether the leader believes this and reacts by trying to extinguish this symptom, “the crisis,” or instead looks beyond and readdresses how to reach the goal from this altered state, will determine his or her long term success in meeting a difficult dilemma.

Leaders can increase their emotional intelligence by using self-help tools, working with a coach/mentor or therapist and a variety of programs. Many individuals who struggle at the lower levels of Emotional Intelligence may employ certain tactics, which keep them disengaged from their own internal dialogue. Numerous people spend time distracting others and even themselves, interrupting or changing the subject when it becomes uncomfortable to experience an emotion. It is important as a leader with a high IQ, to connect and regulate his or her emotional state.

Healthy emotions contradict each other, as they rise and fall like a wave throughout the day. Many people are afraid to experience this sensation. The key is to practice self-awareness and not cut the feeling of the emotion short, but to, instead, allow it to reach its peaks and fade away naturally. Every time an individual creates a connection to his or her emotional state they are in effect enhancing their Emotional Intelligence. There are several ways to increase Emotional Intelligence, not mentioned here. The key is operating from this emotionally stable place no matter what is going on in the environment around an individual. In times of crisis, authentic leadership is required.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tracy-crossley/emotional-intelligence-an_b_6219080.html

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

 

Bounce Back … Not Set Back … Are You Outperforming the Competition?

Strategies: Why ‘emotionally intelligent’ sales teams outperform the competition

Emotional intelligence has long been studied in the executive, leadership world. However, sales leaders have not been as quick to embrace the idea of soft skills. They often confuse soft skills with, well, soft sales results.

It’s time to challenge your thinking and gain an edge on your non-educated competitors. Successful sales organizations may not be labeling certain skills or activities as soft skills, but when you take a closer look, these top-performing cultures are embracing and leveraging the power of emotional intelligence skills. Here are three traits that help sales teams win more business with the right customers.

1: They are competitive and collaborative. Great salespeople are competitive. They also know who and where the real competition is — and it’s not the person sitting next to you. Sales organizations lose thousands of dollars every year because of a lack of teamwork. Salespeople don’t ask for referrals from clients because they are concerned that the referral might not be in their territory or vertical they are selling. Others don’t want to share best practices because they’re concerned their insights might help a team member get better. Maybe even give them a run for top sales dog position.

News alert: the competition is outside the building, not inside the building. Emotionally intelligent sales organizations recognize it takes a “sales village” to win. Veterans are encouraged to mentor and help newbies. Ramp-up time is decreased and the newbie is on their way to earning commission checks quicker. Top performers share their best practices. These smart salespeople realize that one hot shot salesperson hitting quota doesn’t insure financial stability or consistent growth for the company.

Is your sales team competing with one another or the competition?

penguins

 

 

 

 

 

2: They are comprised of salespeople with high self-management skills. Does anyone else find it strange that sales managers have to keep asking salespeople to do what they get paid to do? For example, a salesperson interviews for a position, knowing that it requires both business development and closing sales.The salesperson is pretty good the first month on the job. Then lack of self-management (discipline) sets in. Activity metrics aren’t hit, affecting sales results. When asked the reason, excuses abound.

“I don’t have time.”

Translation: I lack the discipline to calendar block and set aside specific times for business development and account management.

“My prospects buy only on price.” Translation: I lack the discipline to invest time honing my consultative selling skills. Salespeople with good self-management skills have the ability to set goals, define the action steps to reach the goal and most important: execute. They don’t need to be cajoled or forced into doing what they are paid to do. They are similar to top athletes who choose to train during the off season to be better during the real season.

Is your sales team self-managing or management dependent for sales results?

3: They manage stress well.

The bounce-back factor is important in sales. Every sales person experiences setbacks. The deal that was 90 percent closed went away because of an unexpected change in decision makers. You are prospecting consistently and still hearing “no” more than “yes.” Salespeople lacking the ability to handle stress become less productive due to Biology 101. When your body gets stressed, it emits the stress hormone of cortisol. As a result, clarity of thinking and creativity are diminishes. Fatigue sets in. The result is non-productive, no production sales behaviors and results.

The No. 1 quality found in salespeople who handle stress well is the ability to change their perspective on adversity. Instead of whining, moaning and inviting people to a pity party, they ask themselves critical questions.

  • What’s good about this setback?
  • Where’s the lesson?
  • How can I learn from this adversity to do better in the future?

This lesson learned mindset creates energy and focus on what can be done rather than what can’t be done. Years ago, a very successful colleague of mine was on his way to close a six-figure deal. He received a phone call from his prospect on the way to the meeting. His prospect’s biggest customer just filed bankruptcy and all decisions were on hold. My colleague’s response was typical of a person that handles stress well. “Oh well. Some will, some won’t, time for me to find another prospect.” He didn’t miss a beat and exceeded his quota for the year.

Does your team bounce back or get set back?

In 2015, look at those perceived soft, squishy skills called emotional intelligence. Soft skills do produce hard sales results.

Colleen Stanley

http://www.bizjournals.com/denver/blog/broadway_17th/2014/12/strategies-why-emotionally-intelligent-sales-teams.html?page=all

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

Get Emotionally Rich

It pays to have an eye for emotions

Researchers from the University of Bonn found that people who are good at recognizing the emotions of others earn more money in their jobs

Attending to and caring about the emotions of employees and colleagues – that’s for wimps, not for tough businesspeople and efficient performers, right? Wrong! An extensive international study has now shown: The “ability to recognize emotions” affects income. The corresponding author of the study is Professor Dr. Gerhard Blickle of the Department of Psychology at the University of Bonn. The results are published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior.

“Although managing employees and dealing with people often involves reading their emotions and determining their moods, not everyone is good at it,” Blickle says. “It’s the same as foreign languages or athletics: some people are good at it, while others aren’t. Most people can do a sit-up. But not everyone is an Olympic champion.” In order to compare and measure how well someone can recognize the emotions of other people, the researchers used a validated collection of images and recordings of actors and children – that is, of people who have learned to clearly express their feelings or who do not want to hide their feelings in an “adult” manner. These emotion expressions (24 pictures of faces and 24 voice recordings) were then shown to 142 working adults who were recruited to participate in this research study. The participants were asked to recognize the emotion expression – whether it was angry or sad, happy or scared, for example. “On average, the participants succeeded in 77 percent of the cases,” Blickle reports. “People who succeeded in 87 percent of the cases were considered to be good, and people who succeeded in more than 90 percent of the cases were considered really good. Those below 60 percent, in contrast, were seen as not so good in recognizing emotions.”

Once the emotion recognition task was completed, the researchers asked the participants’ colleagues and supervisors to assess the political skills of the participants (for example, whether participants socially well attuned, influential, apparently sincere, and good as networkers). According to Blickle, the result indicated that people with a good ability to recognize emotions “are considered more socially and politically skilled than others by their colleagues. Their supervisors also attribute better social and political skills to these people. And, most notably, their income is significantly higher.”

The “special strength” of the study is “that we were able to exclude alternative explanations,” Blickle adds. Numerous factors affect the income of an employee: biological sex, age, training, weekly working hours, and hierarchical position in the company. “We controlled for all these variants,” Blickle reports. “The effect of the ability to recognize emotions on income still remained.” And, the researchers replicated their own findings in an independent second study with 156 participants, thus underpinning the robustness of their results.

Can the ability to recognize feelings be increased?

The researchers have come to the conclusion that, among other things, more value should be placed on the skill of recognizing emotions in the selection of managers – especially in professions where contact with people is important. “Often we hear managers speak of understanding and esteem,” Blickle says critically, “but when we look at their management behavior, we realize that they have neither.”

Can the ability to recognize emotions be trained with a lasting impact? Various methods exist that presumably enhance “emotional intelligence”. But as Blickle explains, these methods often fall short of effectively training the ability to recognize the feelings of others in the first place because it is implicitly assumed that this ability is already well honed among those who do such trainings. “I know of no study of high scientific standards that showed that the recognition of emotions lastingly can be improved,” Blickle adds. More research is necessary to answer this question.

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Publication: Momm, T. D.; Blickle, G.; Liu, Y., Wihler, A., Kholin, M. , & Menges, J.: It pays to have an eye for emotions: Emotion recognition ability indirectly predicts annual income. Journal of Organizational Behavior, DOI: 10.1002/job.1975

URL: http://www.aow-bonn.de/www/startseite.html

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-11/uob-ipt111914.php

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

 

Occupations Out of Touch

50% of occupations today will no longer exist in 2025: Report

MUMBAI: A paradigm shift is expected to be witnessed in the way workplaces operate over the next 15 years, making nearly 50 per cent of occupations existing today redundant by 2025, a report has said.

Artificial intelligence will transform businesses and the work that people do. Process work, customer work and vast swathes of middle management will simply disappear, it said.

The report titled ‘Fast Forward 2030: The Future of Work and the Workplace’ has been prepared by realty consulting firm CBRE and China-based Genesis, a property developer, after interviewing 220 experts, business leaders and young people from Asia, Europe and North America.

“Nearly 50 per cent of occupations today will no longer exist in 2025. New jobs will require creative intelligence, social and emotional intelligence and ability to leverage artificial intelligence. Those jobs will be immensely more fulfilling than today’s jobs,” the report said.

the-sign-old-wood-of-way-to-office-100124730Workspaces with row of desks will become completely redundant, not because they are not fit for purpose, but simply because that purpose no longer exists, it said.

 

“The next 15 years will see a revolution in how we work, and a corresponding revolution will necessarily take place on how we plan and think about workplaces.

“The dramatic changes in how people work that we have seen in the past two decades will continue to evolve over the next 15 years, opening up new opportunities for companies to create value and enhance employee performance through innovative workplace strategies and designs,” CBRE South Asia Chairman and Managing Director Anshuman Magazine said.

He said many of these opportunities have in fact already arrived, and by seizing them early, smart companies can gain a competitive advantage.

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2014-11-08/news/55894422_1_real-estate-transactions-intelligence-new-jobs

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

Smartphones but Less Smart Kids?

Study: Kids who ditch smartphones for outdoor fun are ‘substantially’ better at reading emotions

A new study suggests that excessive smartphone use is hurting kids’ ability to read social cues.

Using the gold standard of psychological testing, experimental field design, researchers from UCLA took a random selection of sixth-grade students to an outdoor camp for five days. Compared to a control group, in the camp group, “we found that children who were away from screens for five days with many opportunities for in-person interaction improved significantly in reading facial emotion,” the research team explained.

The researchers measured emotional intelligence by asking students to read the emotions from pictures of strangers’ faces. Those with good emotional intelligence can tell if someone is happy, sad, or frustrated simply by their facial expressions.

The team concluded: “The absence of screens meant children could rely only on face-to-face interaction when communicating during camp activities. Accordingly, the results suggest that digital screen time, even when used for social interaction, could reduce time spent best friendsdeveloping skills in reading nonverbal cues of human emotion.”

Middle-school is awkward enough; the inability to read social skills could make things even worse.

Now, this is not to say that all electronics are bad. One study, for instance, found that girls who played video games were closer to their male counterparts in spatial intelligence.

Electronics and digital communication have their benefits, but so does in-person social interaction.

http://venturebeat.com/2014/08/23/study-kids-who-ditch-smartphones-for-outdoor-fun-are-substantially-better-at-reading-emotions/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Venturebeat+(VentureBeat)

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org

 

 

 

IQ Gets you Hired, But EQ Gets You Promoted!

What’s emotional intelligence got to do with it?

Marty Jordan:

I was recently coaching a leader who had the potential to do great things. All that was missing was a little thing called emotional intelligence. And that “little” thing was holding him back. I’m sure you know this type of person—smart, quick, articulate and out to prove he is the smartest person in the room.

In our first coaching session a few months back, he described himself as being strong on accountability and had no issue calling people out on their deficiencies. Note to self…doesn’t suffer fools gladly. He told me he was very competitive and he never played team sports but did excel at shot put and discus. Note to self…didn’t learn to play well with others. When I asked about his hobbies, he told me he was into fly fishing. Note to self…prefers own company versus others. And when he talked about his team, he told me how he had whittled it down (interesting choice of words, I thought to myself) to people who could handle his public confrontation. He seemed to think that a good leader doesn’t sugarcoat the truth. Note to self…this guy leads by intimidation.

As you might guess, this was an individual who got results and he was sure it was his smart and technical brilliance that helped him get to where he was. My challenge as a coach was to convince him that what got him here wouldn’t get him there—the promotion he wanted—without improving his emotional savvy and ability to build strong working relationships both with his team and his peers.

I remembered watching the Steve Jobs biopic awhile back and thinking, what better way to have this guy see himself in action than to watch this movie and witness the impact of Jobs’s leadership style on everyone around him. When I suggested that he watch the movie he resisted because he detested Ashton Kutcher, but eventually, he agreed, and at our next coaching session, he was a whole new person. He told me he now “got” what I was saying about that technical brilliance versus emotional savvy. And I knew he was open to change when he said, “I would hate to think I drove people away like Jobs did with Wozniak.”

Steve JobsFrom that point forward he was all “ears” to my suggestions. I had him take emotional intelligence assessments so he knew exactly the behaviors he needed to stop doing and start doing. I exposed him to the concept of “balancing advocacy and inquiry” and learning to ask good questions instead of the leading questions that he said he was guilty of doing. We explored the art of “small talk” and the importance of social interaction. We also talked about the importance of just slowing down, not needing to respond in the moment, and giving himself time to think about how what he says will be received by the other person.

There were lots of strategies we talked about and experimented with over the months I coached him; however, that movie was the key to unlocking his willingness to do something different. So, if ever you find yourself needing to coach or work with someone like this, have him or her watch the Steve Jobs movie. It brought self-awareness to my coachee and created the readiness for him to be coached. It may even result in your colleague getting a promotion, just like mine did. As they say…IQ gets you hired, but EQ (i.e. emotional intelligence) gets you promoted!

http://mylinkage.com/blog/whats-emotional-intelligence-got-to-do-with-it/

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Geetu-High Quality Res     Geetu Bharwaney                        

Geetu is the Founding Director of Ei World Limited, one of Europe’s thought leaders in the application of emotional intelligence in business.  Her main interest lies in organisation development through leadership skills development.  She has built emotional intelligence interventions from scratch and has proven measurable results with individuals and groups.

http://www.eiworld.org